Translators

2:1
Born and raised in the Skipton area, Alison Abbey relished the opportunity to be involved in this project, combining her love of translation with her interest in local history. Alison worked as a technical translator for GEC High Voltage Switchgear in Manchester in collaboration with Siemens AG for 5 years. After returning home to start a family, she continued to translate for the BSI Technical Help for Exporters Translation Service for several years before training to become a teacher of German and French, and has recently retired after 24 years of teaching at Beckfoot School.
2:1
Emily is a final-year undergraduate student of French and German. In her final year she has chosen to focus on translation in both French and German, and to write her dissertation about POW camps in the First World War, so she feels that the opportunity to improve her translation skills whilst enhancing her research by translating such a fascinating piece of work from this period of history is really a privilege. In her free time she enjoys  being involved in the athletics and kickboxing societies at University, and never misses a chance to discover a new city.
2:1
Ryan is a postgraduate student on the MA in Applied Translation.  Born and raised in Burnley, just over the Yorkshire-Lancashire border from Skipton, he feels privileged to be involved in this project which combines his local pride with his love for all things language-related.  He hopes to pursue a career as a professional translator after the completion of his Masters, and in his spare time he enjoys travel, exploring European cinema and following his beloved Burnley FC around the country.
2:1
Anne is a Lecturer in German and Translation Studies at the University of Leeds. She has lived in Skipton since 2002 so has a particular local interest in the project. In her spare time she enjoys running and cycling in the Yorkshire Dales.
Ken Cockburn is a freelance poet, translator, editor and writing tutor based in Edinburgh. Formerly Fieldworker and Assistant Director at the Scottish Poetry Library, he has wide experience of running poetry sessions for children and adults in a range of settings, indoor and outdoor. His published translations include poems by Thomas Brasch, Christine Marendon, Arne Rautenberg and Thomas Rosenlöcher, some of which are collected in the book Feathers & Lime (2007); and fiction by Christopher Ecker. His translations of Arne Rautenberg’s poems were collected as Snapdragon (2012), and a volume of translations of Christine Marendon is forthcoming from Carcanet. He has been commended twice in the Stephen Spender Prize for poetry in translation.
kencockburn.co.uk
2:1
Emily is a final-year undergraduate student in English and German.  Taking a particular interest in the study of English and German literature, she is delighted to be involved in the process of making this fascinating and insightful diary available to an English-speaking readership.  In her spare time, she enjoys reading, travel and going to live music events.
2:1
Catriona is a final-year undergraduate student of French and German, who, having grown-up just over the border in Lancashire, thoroughly enjoys both German and French translation and has a keen interest in German history. Alongside her degree, she enjoys travelling and discovering new cultures and cuisines.
2:1
Mhairi is an undergraduate student in German in her final year. She is interested in German history, and takes a particular interest in individuals' experiences of past events. In her spare time, she enjoys life-drawing and reading.
2:1
York-born Hilary is a Teaching Fellow in German to English translation at the University of Leeds. Her current research focuses on cultural memory and remembering. She also has experience in the translation industry so the Skipton diary project is giving her the opportunity to combine her two interests.
2:1
Alan has lived in Barnoldswick, a small town near Skipton, for over thirty years. He taught Science at a secondary school in Burnley. At the same time he was able to study for a part-time degree in German in Leeds. Following the closure of his school he worked as a freelance scientific and technical translator for several years.
2:1
Toni is a final-year undergraduate student in German at the University of Leeds. Enthusiastic about history and literary translation, she jumped at the chance to be able to combine the two whilst translating Kriegsgefangen in Skipton. In her spare time she enjoys drinking copious amounts of tea and reads widely: she has recently enjoyed reading Helen Forrester's memoirs of growing up in Liverpool during the Great Depression.
2:1
Charlotte is studying translation from German and French into English on the MA Applied Translation Studies course. She is enjoying exploring the unique insight the diary offers into the POWs’ experiences, as well as the opportunity to experiment with literary translation, which she is considering as a career path. Outside of her studies, Charlotte is a keen baker and can often be found causing chaos in the kitchen.
2:1
Sixth form students Becky Ackroyd, Madeleine Lloyd, Matthew Griffiths, Felecia Sutton, Harriet Paulatt-Brig, Matthew Rushton and teacher Jessica Mahler.
2:1
Caroline is a Lecturer in Comparative Literary Translation at the University of Leeds; her research focuses on contemporary German literature and the translation of authorship. She has experience as a freelance translator and an interest in local history.
2:1
Hannah is a postgraduate student currently working towards her MA in Conference Interpreting and Translation Studies, and works from German and French into English. Having studied English and German as an undergrad, she is enjoying her return to literary translation with the Skipton diaries, and hopes she’ll be lucky enough to work on many more translation projects as interesting as this in the future.
Ada Whitaker taught students of English at Hamburg University for many years, the teaching including literature and translation, and she has also translated a number of academic books on literature and on sociology. After retiring and settling part-time in Keighley, where she grew up, she was delighted to find a project that could make use of her German skills, as well as offering a wonderful opportunity to learn new things about her native area.
Sheila Goodhall, Keith Bradshaw, Alison Tyas, Keith Hewitt, Peter Beech and David Hall.
David is a postgraduate student on the MA in Applied Translation at the University of Leeds.