News

German Prisoners of the Great War. Life in a Yorkshire Camp edited by Anne Buckley was published by Pen & Sword on 9 February 2021 An online book launch organised by Skipton Town Hall and Skipton Library is being held on 29 April at 7pm. Speakers include: Actor Wolf Kahler,...

The story of Friedrich Siems, who directed the theatre in the camp, has been researched  by Harriet Purbrick, a University of Leeds History student who has won a Laidlaw Scholarship to work on the Skipton POW camp project for two years. Friedrich Siems was captured on 20 July 1918 at...

I can’t believe it’s almost a year since the last blog post! The big news is that the book is now finished! It’s been typeset, the proofs checked and the index compiled. The estimated publication date is now February 2021 – details of launch events will be posted here nearer...

This blog post is the work of summer intern Joe Everitt, who has been mapping the home addresses of the Skipton prisoners. Alongside exploring the injuries and illnesses suffered by the prisoners from Skipton camp, my fellow intern Alice and I have also spent time researching where the prisoners lived....

On 12th July actor Wolf Kahler, the grandson of the senior German officer in the Skipton prisoner-of-war camp, Fritz Sachsse, officially opened our new information board and gave a moving speech in which he shared his personal memories of his grandfather. The event was attended by around 150 people including...

This summer we have two student interns working on the project. One of them, Alice Craft, has been looking at the extent of the injuries and illness among the Skipton prisoners: As the translation of Kriegsgefangen in Skipton is receiving its final touches ready for publication, two student interns on...

In early 1919, 47 of the German prisoners of war from Raikeswood Camp died when an outbreak of Spanish Flu hit the camp. 42 of them died in Morton Banks hospital where they were being treated and another 5 died in the camp. The funerals took place at Morton Cemetery,...

On 13th January 1919 16 student prisoners of war in Raikeswood Camp sat the written examinations for their Abitur (German equivalent of ‘A’ level). The oral examinations followed on 28th, 29th and 30th January. The men had been taught by some of their fellow prisoners who were qualified schoolteachers. These...

For some of the Skipton prisoners Christmas 1918 was their fifth in captivity. One of the NCOs, Adolf Schonek, describes the celebrations in the camp: Christmas had come around again, the fifth time in captivity for many of us. But this time it had a special meaning: the old Christmas...