Excerpts

In early 1919, 47 of the German prisoners of war from Raikeswood Camp died when an outbreak of Spanish Flu hit the camp. 42 of them died in Morton Banks hospital where they were being treated and another 5 died in the camp. The funerals took place at Morton Cemetery,...

On 13th January 1919 16 student prisoners of war in Raikeswood Camp sat the written examinations for their Abitur (German equivalent of ‘A’ level). The oral examinations followed on 28th, 29th and 30th January. The men had been taught by some of their fellow prisoners who were qualified schoolteachers. These...

For some of the Skipton prisoners Christmas 1918 was their fifth in captivity. One of the NCOs, Adolf Schonek, describes the celebrations in the camp: Christmas had come around again, the fifth time in captivity for many of us. But this time it had a special meaning: the old Christmas...

On 4th December 1918 the German POWs in the Skipton camp received notification from the Prussian Ministry for Education and Cultural Affairs (via the Swiss Embassy) that permission had been granted to the qualified teachers in the camp to set oral and written examinations for their 16 ‘pupils’ (younger prisoners)...

At the time of the Armistice Britain held approximately 90,000 German prisoners of war in the UK. For these men the Armistice brought fear and anxiety; they were worried about what the future held for them, their families and for their homeland. They describe their feelings in Kriegsgefangen in Skipton:...

This week is the centenary of the arrival of the first German officers to Raikeswood Camp. On January 17th, 19th and 21st 1918 50 prisoners each day travelled by train from the camp at Colsterdale, 5 miles west of Masham, where they had been held following their capture on the...

We are delighted to welcome poet and translator Ken Cockburn to our team of translators (https://kencockburn.co.uk/). Ken has begun to translate some of the many poems in the diary including two from Charlotte’s section about Christmas that we posted earlier in the week. Here is the section again, this time...

The German POWs spent Christmas 1918 in Skipton. One of our student interns, Charlotte Smith, has been translating the section of the diary in which an officer called Köstlin describes the celebrations in the camp: “Die Adventzeit eilt dahin. Eines Morgens wachst du auf – und Weihnacht ist da. Lieber...